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The Beatles: From Me To You - - (Table view)

Other recordings of From Me To You:

Composed by Lennon & McCartney

From Me To You is written in the tourbus - which really was an old van. In february 1963 they were on their way from York to Shrewsbury. The Beatles was on tour with Helen Saphiro, who was the headliner, and some other artists. The title was inspired from the "letter to the editor" column in the music paper "New Musical Express", which had the title "From You To Us". They rephrased the title and made it a title for a love song.

The "oooh" at the end of the bridge is taken from "Twist and Shout". When another artist on the tour, Kenny Lynch heard this, he said "You can't do that. You'll sound like a bunch of fucking fairies". They presented the song for Helen Saphiro, and she liked it. The next test was when John and Paul sung the song for Paul's father, James McCartney. He nodded his head and said "nice little tune". But the final test was when they presented the tune for producer George Martin. When he said "yes, you can write songs", then they knew it was good enough - with the "oooh".

The modulation into the bridge was a landmarkd in Lennon-McCartney's songwriting. Paul McCartney said this about the song:

"The thing I liked about "From Me to You" was it had a very complete middle. It went to a surprising place. The opening chord of the middle section of that song heralded a new batch for me. That was a pivotal song. Our songwriting lifted a little with that song."

The song is in the key of C. The opening is several I-vi changes, with the C and Am chords. The verse goes C-Am - C-G7 - F-Am-C-G7-C.

The bridge is a ii-V-I change in the key of F, or v-I7-IV if we spell it based on the home key C. No matter how you spell it, the chords are Gm7-C7-F.

It returns to C over the chords D7-G-Gaug. Again the Gaug function as a G7 chord. Looking backward, one could descirbe the D7 as a minor to major substitution in the vi chord in the key of F, giving the D instead of Dm. Looking forward, it leads the music in the direction of the key of G, through a V-I change (D-G). And then the G changes to Gaug, which leads back to C in another V-I change (G-C).

Progressions

  • IV-II-V-I Modulation
  • Now we have to find the way back home to C, or rather The Beatles have to lead us back home, which will be a I-V modulation from F, or IV-I if we see it from C. We leave F-major as soon as it is established. From F we go to D7. This a chord that belongs neither to F-major nor to C-major. As it is in the dominant seventh form, it points in the direction of G. And G is the next chord we get. But we soon get a rather dramatic ending of the bridge, as they alter the G to an augmented Gaug chord. The tension created by Gaug is resolved when we finally get the C-chord at the beginning of the next verse, and we are back home. If we look at the chord in retrospect, from the home key of C-major, we are leaving the F-major an reentering C-major throug a IV-II-V-I progression, as seen from C-major.

  • I-vi vamp
  • From Alan W. Pollack's "Notes on "From Me To You"":

    The prominence given to the I-vi chord progression in "From Me To You" is something fairly widespread among the early L&M originals. Similarly, the gratuitous dominant seventh on F in measure 5 of the verse ("gratuitous" to the extent that it doesn't actually function as a dominant seventh but merely comes along for the spice it adds), and the augmented triad in the bridge are also fairly typical L&M chord tricks. There are, however, a few more novel details elsewhere in the harmony.

  • vi Chord Relative minor (Submediant)
  • vi Ending Ending in relative minor
  • From Alan W. Pollack's "Notes on "From Me To You"":

    What we get is quite enigmatically ingenious: the very next chord following the augmented one turns out, indeed, to be C Major, the I chord of our home key, yet the music immediately proceeds with one final statement of the hook phrase before terminating abruptly on the 'a' minor chord. The musical logic of bringing down the curtain on the hook phrase is so subtly persuasive, that you barely note the ironic fact that the song has ended off-center from the home key; actually on the chord of the home key's relative minor.

    Special chords

    aug

    From Alan W. Pollack's "Notes on "From Me To You"":

    The melodic content is more chromatic than usual, a combination of the bluesy E-flats in the verses, the modulation effecting B-flats at the start of the bridges, and the D# atop the augmented chord at the very end of the bridges. The verse tune is somewhat jumpy and covers the range of a full octave. The bridge tune covers a slightly smaller range and is primarily stepwise.

    The prominence given to the I-vi chord progression in "From Me To You" is something fairly widespread among the early L&M originals. Similarly, the gratuitous dominant seventh on F in measure 5 of the verse ("gratuitous" to the extent that it doesn't actually function as a dominant seventh but merely comes along for the spice it adds), and the augmented triad in the bridge are also fairly typical L&M chord tricks. There are, however, a few more novel details elsewhere in the harmony.

    But the greater source of contrast is the way this section builds toward an ultimate climax as opposed to the arch-like, closed shape of the verse. Particularly in the last two measures we have a pile-up of intensification based on several musical factors -- the augmented inflection of the V chord by literally stretching the D in the melody to a D#, the cross rhythm of slow triplets in the rhythm guitar (must be John, right?), the patented Ringo drum frills, and of course, that crowd pleasing falsetto moan for two-part harmony on the word (ahem) "whooo."

    (...)

    The rhetoric of the lyrics is ably abetted by the antiphonal accompaniment, which includes a descending bass line, which in turn, is nicely reinforced by heavy syncopation and vigorous drum fills. As that bass line moves from C -> A -> A-flat, it incidentally creates yet another **augmented chord, one that is more suspenseful and harmonically ambiguous than the one seen earlier in the bridge.

    This second augmented chord, spelled from bottom up, A-flat/C/E, could move in one of two directions. Either the A-flat can resolve downward, making for a move to C Major, or else, the A-flat can behave as though it were a G#, resolving upward, making for a move to 'a' minor.

    What we get is quite enigmatically ingenious: the very next chord following the augmented one turns out, indeed, to be C Major, the I chord of our home key, yet the music immediately proceeds with one final statement of the hook phrase before terminating abruptly on the 'a' minor chord. The musical logic of bringing down the curtain on the hook phrase is so subtly persuasive, that you barely note the ironic fact that the song has ended off-center from the home key; actually on the chord of the home key's relative minor.

    Modulation

    Tonic - subdominant I-IV / V-I

    From Alan W. Pollack's "Notes on "From Me To You"":

    The song is among the very first of their officially released originals to feature a modulation to an alternate key during the bridge section. In spite of its brevity, the excursus to F Major we'll see below creates an expansive sense of harmonic space that belies the compressed time scale of the song.

    (...)

    We have what is called a pivot modulation to the key of F. The common chord between the home key of C and this new key is the C Major chord at the end of the previous verse. One hears that chord at the time it's first played as the I of the home key. But once the bridge begins, the ear retrospectively reinterprets it as though it were the V of the key of F. Such common chords are not strictly required in order to effect a change of key, but their utilization makes such shifts smoother, and less abrupt. It's somehow analogous to the variety of means by which you might change the topic of conversation.

    I think this modulation deserves a few more comments. The modulation from tonic (I) to subdominant (IV) in the bridge is almost a clich. You end on the I-chord, (C in C-major) which acts as a V-of-IV in the new key (F). If you make the I-chord a I7, you get an even stronger effect with V7-of-IV, which gives a V7-I move into the new key. Both C and F are a diatonic chords in both C-major and F-major, which gives a smooth modulation. But The Beatles does not follow this route. They do not make the I chord into a I7. And they go to Gm, not to F. Gm is not a chord that belongs to C-major, so it is an early depart from C-major. And when the Gm enters, we still do not know where we are going. The Gm is followed by C7 and F, and we finally have the F-major established throug a V7-I change. In retrospect, the Gm is a ii-chord of F-major, and the Gm-C7-F is a ii-V7-I change in F-major.

    Subdominant - tonic IV-II-V-I / I-VI-II-V

    Now we have to find the way back home to C, or rather The Beatles have to lead us back home, which will be a I-V modulation from F, or IV-I if we see it from C. We leave F-major as soon as it is established. From F we go to D7. This a chord that belongs neither to F-major nor to C-major. As it is in the dominant seventh form, it points in the direction of G. And G is the next chord we get. But we soon get a rather dramatic ending of the bridge, as they alter the G to an augmented Gaug chord. The tension created by Gaug is resolved when we finally get the C-chord at the beginning of the next verse, and we are back home. If we look at the chord in retrospect, from the home key of C-major, we are leaving the F-major an reentering C-major throug a IV-II-V-I progression, as seen from C-major.

    Unsettled Major / relative minor

    Books including the song

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    The Beatles Guitar Chord Songbook A-I
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    RefNr: HL699558
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    The Beatles Book
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    The Beatles 1 - Recorded Version Guitar
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    The Beatles for Classical Guitar
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    RefNr: HL699237
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    The Beatles - Complete Scores
    This outstanding hard-cover edition features over 1100 pages with full scores and lyrics to all 210 titles recorded by The Beatles.
    RefNr: HL673228
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    The Beatles Guitar Techniques - Transcribed Solos And Excerpts
    Not only is this a stylistic analysis of the guitar licks and solos of the Beatles, but a deeper study of John, Paul and George's individual guitar concepts andtechniques.
    RefNr: HL660105
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    The Beatles Favorites
    RefNr: HL699249
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    The Beatles Guitar Intros
    Learn to play the intros to 50 of the Beatles' classic songs.
    RefNr: NO90565
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    20 Greatest Hits (Easy Guitar)
    The songs from the album with recording details. Many photographs. Easy guitar edition, arranged with melody line and guitar chord boxes.
    RefNr: NO18277
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    The Beatles Complete Fake Book
    Every song by the 'Fab Four' in freshly engraved top-line arrangements.
    RefNr: NO90535
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    The Best Of 1000 No.1 Hits: The Early Years - Chord Songbook
    Part of the collection of titles to celebrate the first 1000 UK No.1 singles, this huge anthology is packed with your very favourite hits.
    RefNr: AM91903
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    The Beatles: Play-Along Chord Songbook
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    RefNr: NO91069
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    The Complete Rock Guitar Player Omnibus Edition
    All four books from the series in one volume.
    RefNr: AM68826
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    Videos including the song
    CDs including the song

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    The Beatles 1
    RefNr: CD1280526
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    The Beatles - 1962-1966 "Red Album"
    RefNr: CD328644
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    Past Masters 1
    RefNr: CD328360
    Order From:
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    Amazon UK

    Further references:

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