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Guitar Chord Progression:

V - Dominant - Chord

Other Chord progressions

Our second chord is built on the 5th of the scale, which is why it is labeled the V-chord. It is also referred to as the dominant. And it is a dominating a chord which ha a strong message. Usually the message is something like "go home!". In a progression, this is chord that clearly will point us in the direction home.

The majority of tunes have the V-chord, so it does not make very much sense to make a list of songs with this chord. A list of songs that do not have the V-chord would probably not be as long as a list of songs with this chord.

But there are a songs where the V-chord is held in a way that really illustrates the call for a resolution. The half close or imprefect cadence is one example that illustrates how the V-chord says that you have to move on. And the full close or perfect/authentic cadence is a standard way to get home.

Then we have what Dominic Pedler calls dramatic fifths. The harmony is building up tension and exitment until it gets to an orgasmic climax when reaching the V-chord. He list some Beatles tunes with such fifths. It will often be at the end of the bridge where the fifth not only take you back to the home chord, but also to the home key. The most prominent example is Twist and Shout, and one can argue if this part is a bridge section or not. But no matter what lable we put on the section, it will not change the dramatic effect of the V-chord.

Recordings with the V Dominant progression - Annotaded


Books covering the progression -


More >>
Don Mock's Mastering the Dominant Chord
This powerful book and audio lesson will expand your knowledge of not only the familiar "V" dominant 7th, but all of the secondary dominant 7ths that can be found in major and minor keys.
RefNr: AP31949
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Further references:

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