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Lesson 18 - The Modes part II

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Previous page: Lesson 17 - Good Right and Left Hand Technique - V Next page: Lesson 19 - Good Right and Left hand Technique - VI

Lessons of The Week was a series of guitar lessons circulated in "News", in the pre-web days of the Internet. 29 lessons were written before it died out, and I happende to write the first three. They represent a little bit of internet history, as they may have been the first guitar lessons written for the internet.

The lessons were all written in txt format - they were written around the same time as Tim Berners Lee were sitting in Switzerland specifing the first version of html. I have converted them to html, and may have added a few links from the lessons.

Lesson: 18
Title: The Modes part II
Level: Intermediate
Style: Theory
Instructor: David Good

This time around, I want to look at the modes in a slightly different way. In my last lesson, I showed you how to derive the modes by staying within one scale and changing the root note. Now, I will show you how to create each mode while keeping the same root note. This method requires a slightly different way of thinking in that we are changing key each time we change mode, instead of just changing the mode within the same key. This method is far superior to the other method in that you will immediately be able to hear the difference between the modes. Once again, please make sure that you have a halfway decent background in basic theory terms before attempting to tackle this lesson.

The following chart shows how to build each mode on the same root note, and will better show the difference between each mode. Make the following alterations to the major scale to produce the mode:

Ionian= Major Scale
Dorian= b3,b7
Phrygian=b2,b3,b6,b7
Lydian=#4
Mixolydian=b7
Aeolian=b3,b6,b7
Locrian=b2,b3,b5,b6,b7

So, for example, with C as our root note, each mode and its corresponding key would be:

Ionian: C D E F G A B C          Key: C Major

Dorian: C D Eb F G A Bb C        Key: Bb Major

Phrygian: C Db Eb F G Ab Bb C    Key: Ab Major

Lydian: C D E F# G A B C         Key: G Major

Mixolydian: C D E F G A Bb C     Key: F Major

Aeolian: C D Eb F G Ab Bb C      Key: Eb Major

Locrian: C Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C    Key: Db Major

Now, if you were to play all of these back to back, you would be able to hear quite well the difference between the modes. Like I said before, this is a much better way to learn them than the method I presented in my last lesson. As always feel free to contact me with any questions or comments.

Dave blj@tiamat.umd.umich.edu

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|  "Has the dawn ever seen your eyes?  |
|   Have the days made you so unwise,  |
|   Realize, you are........."         |
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Previous page: Previous page: Lesson 17 - Good Right and Left Hand Technique - VNext page: Lesson 19 - Good Right and Left hand Technique - VI Next page:

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Previous page: Lesson 17 - Good Right and Left Hand Technique - V Next page: Lesson 19 - Good Right and Left hand Technique - VI