Previous page:

Blues Guitar - Tritone Blues 1

Next page:
Previous page: Blues Guitar - Tritone Next page: Blues Guitar - Tritone Blues - Part 2

Tritone is an interval with three whole-steps. In a normal major scale, you find the tritone between the 4th and 7th note, which is F and B in the key of C. The tritone might also be called an augmented fourth. A perfect fourth consists of two whole-steps and a half step, while the augmented fourth have three whole steps. If you listen to the tritone, you should notice that it is a disharmonic interval, with a restless sound that call for some kind of harmonic resolution.

The tritone is the half of an octave, thus dividing the octave in two equal parts. If you take the interval B to F in the key of C-major, you will notice that it consists of two whole steps (C-D and D-E), and two half-steps (B-C and E-F). This interval is called a diminished fifth. But both the tritone and the diminished fifth have six half steps, meaning that the distance from bottom to top is the same. The ear cannot tell the difference between the two intervals, at least not when they are not played in a musical context. In theory they are different, but in practice they are (almost) the same.

Now you should notice that F and B are two of the notes in a G7 chord. If you start from a G-major chord, with the notes G-B-D, and add the minor 7th (F), you have G-B-D-F. And there you have the diminished fifth between B and F, and you will have the F to B tritone if you invert the chord. And now one of the lessons to lean: It is the tritone or diminished fifth that gives the 7th chord it's character. If you are in C-major, the B is often referred to as the leading note, while the F might be called a leaning note. The diminished fifth between B and F creates a tension. The tension is resolved when you go from B to C and F to E, and by that going from the diminished fifth to a major third (C to F). You can omit the other notes from the chord, both the G and the D, and it will still function as a G7. Try playing just the interval B-F instead of a G7, and it still works. But if you take away the B and/or the F, it will no longer function as a G7 chord.

If you compare a G7 and a Gm7, you should notice that the minor7 has a much smoother and more jazzy sound, and it does not create the same tension as the G7. One major difference is that there is no tritone in a m7 chord. The Gm7 consists of G-Bb-D-F. From Bb to F there is a perfect fifth, and from F to Bb there is a perfect fourth. The minor 7th interval from G to F and the corresponding major second from F to G are two dissonant intervals. But they are not as dissonant as the tritone/diminished fifth. And the G7 has the dissonant tritone/diminished fifth in addition to the minor 7th/major second.

You will also find the diminished fifth in the diminished chord. The diminished chord consists of to minor thirds on top of each other. A Bdim (also notated as B°) have the notes B-D-F. And now you should note that if you have a G and put a Bdim chord on top of it, you get a G7 chord. There are some clues to chord substitution in this knowledge, but this will not be covered in this lesson.

The tritone / diminished fifth is an easy interval to finger on the guitar. You find it in these positions:

xxxxx

Then we can play a simple 12-bar blues in the key of A, with the the root note in the bass, and the VIIb-III tritone interval of each chord. I fingerpick, with a monotone bass technique.

Simple Tritone Blues 1 in A


 
PDF-File

In the next 12-bar blues, I utilize the magic of inverting these chords. The VIIb-III tritone interval of an A7 chord is G - C#. Now the III-VIIb diminished fifth interval in a D7 is F# - C. This means that you can just move the "chord" one fret down, and then you have the inverted interval of the IV7 chord. And then there is no prize for guessing that you can move this "chord" up two fret to the V7 chord. You should also try to slide into these position from one fret below or one fret above, and you can slide from the V7 to the IV7 chord. I will play one round of 12-bar blues with a bass-lick combined with a tritone that goes like this:

Some General Blues - books

Top Seller


More >>
Blues Guitar Tab White Pages
This outstanding collection features note-for-note transcriptions with tab for 150 blues classics! Songs include: Baby, Please Don't Go * Born Under a Bad Sign * Bridge of Sighs * Cold Shot * Couldn't Stand the Weather * Cross Road Blues (Crossroads) * Double Trouble * Everyday I Have the Blues * I Can't Quit You Baby * I'm Tore Down * Killing Floor * Love in Vain Blues * Motherless Child * Pride and Joy * The Sky Is Crying * Statesboro Blues * Sweet Home Chicago * Texas Flood * The Thrill Is Gone * Tube Snake Boogie * and dozens more!
RefNr: HL700131
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Other Books


More >>
Blues You Can Use Book Of Guitar Chords
A reference guide to blues, R&B, jazz, and rock rhythm guitar, with hundreds of voicings, chord theory construction, chord progressions and exercises and much more.
RefNr: HL695082
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
MusicRoom
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Basic Blues Guitar Method, Book 2
RefNr: AP19441
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
The Complete Contemporary Guitarist
The ultimate guide to music for blues, rock, and jazz guitarists
RefNr: AP33502
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Blues Cruise
Hal Leonard's Essential Elements Guitar Repertoire Series features great original guitar music that is carefully graded and leveled for easy selection.
RefNr: HL470
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Go here for full list of General Blues books

General Blues - videos


More >>
Basic Blues Guitar Method 1
RefNr: AP22892
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus

More >>
House Of Blues: Learn To Play Blues Guitar - Level 1
Instructor John McCarthy provides a solid foundation in blues playing with this set of one-on-one lessons.
RefNr: FR00932
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
MusicRoom
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Alfred's PLAY Blues Guitar 2
What do YOU want to PLAY today? The PLAY series has nailed down what today's musician really wants: lessons you can use anytime, anywhere. Theyre flat-out more convenient than private lessons, and just as valuable. The high-quality video of expert instructors will help players of all skill levels, from beginners and "weekend warriors" to advanced students and pros. Whether you're into rock, jazz, blues, folk, country, or a little bit of everything, the PLAY series has all the resources you need at the click of a button.
RefNr: AP34185
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Go here for full list of General Blues videos

Previous page: Next page:
Previous page: Blues Guitar - Tritone Next page: Blues Guitar - Tritone Blues - Part 2