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Add the m7 chord - Part 4

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Here we are developing further the progression we used in the Flat Five Substitution Lesson - Part 3. Go to this lesson if you think we are going into too unfamiliar territory.



 
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If you have been through the Flat Five Substitution Lesson - Part 2, you may recall that I discussed the notation of the chords.We are running into the same problem here, and we have to make a compromize between a correct notation and a notation that shows the voice leading. Again it is a kind of information you do not really have to worry about, and I guess that the majority of you readers out there would not notice the difference. But I want to use correct note spelling, and I want those of you who might be interested (if any) to know why I sometimes deviate from this principle. It is only a matter if you read the standard notation. In tablature, the various spelling of notes do not make any difference.

The A7 in a 1-7-3 voicing should be notated with some kind of a 1, 7 and 3 note, which would be some kind of A, G and C. The C-type note here is a C#. In the first example, when playing the chords Eb7-A7, as in bars 2 and 5, I have chosen to notate the enharmonic Db instead of C#. The Db is some kind of a 4th, and not a third, so the chord is notated as 1-7-b4 instead of the correct 1-7-3. The reason is that we are comming from a Eb7, which has the Db, and to make clear that this note is not moving, it just formally change it's name, I keep the Db spelling. In the next example, this is not an issue, so there I have preferred the correct spelling.

We have the same kind of problem with the E7 chord. In bar 4, where the first example is taken from, we come from a Bb7 that has the note Ab in it. The E7 does not have Ab, but the enharmonic G#. But again I prefer to keep the Ab to make clear that the note is note moving, despite that it will give an incorrect notation of the E7 chord. In bar 6, the reason is that we are going to the Bb7 with a Ab in the next bar. One could argue that it should have been spelled as the enharmonic chord Fb7 instead of E7. By spelling the bass note Cb instead of B, the movement in the bass would have been clearer. But then we would have had trouble with the D on top. In Fb7 the correct spelling would have been Ebb. But I do not think many guitar players easily can relate to the Fb7 chord and the note Ebb. E7 is familar territory, so I prefer to use this label and basic spelling. In bar 9 (second example), we do not have this kind of problem, so here I have used a correct spelling of the E7 chord.

Finally, the spelling of the B7 in bar 10 should have been B-A-D#, and not B-A-Eb. Again the reason is that the chord we come from, the F7, has a Eb in it.

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