Bing Hodneland logo

Bestsellers

Books

List Bestselling Books

DVDs

List Bestselling DVDs

Google

Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
In Association with Amazon.co.uk

All the information on this site is free. But if it is of value to you, I appreciate a tip.


Previous page:

Music Theory for Guitar - The Authentic Cadence

Next page:
Previous page: Music Theory for Guitar - 7 means 4: 7th chords Next page: Music Theory for Guitar - The Plagal Cadence

The authentic cadence - V-I change

The 5th note of the scale is an unstable note. It want to move somewhere. When acting as a fifth in a chord, it is stable, particularly in the root or tonic chord. But on it's own, or as root of the V chord, it is a restless friend. It want to go to the tonic, either up a fourth or down a fifth. Play the C-major scale from C to G, and then pause. This is not the place you want to stay. Add the C either up or down, and the music settles down.

This concluding power of the G-C move in the C-major scale, can be reinforced by the chords G-major and C-major, acting as V and I in the key of C-major. Play the the chords C-G-C, and listen to how the G-C change concludes the passage. The V-I is probably the most common ending in music, so I am sure you know many songs with this concluding device. This is what is known as the authentic cadence. When you end a musical statement with this cadence, it is called a full close.

You can of course just strum the chords. But you should look at and listen to possible voice leadings from G to C. Play G in first inversion and C in root position, and you will get a nice and smooth change.

The two chords has the note G as a common note. When you want to conclude, the I chord should take the command. And as you remember, you get the strongest concluding statement if you end on the I chord in root position. G is on the top of C in root position, and then it should have the same position in the G-chord. The middle note go from D up to E, which is a conjunct move. The bottom note goes from the leading note B to the tonic C. Everything is nice and smooth. G C
G = G
D - E
B - C

There are many ways leading up to the V-chord. But we can start is simple, with just the I and the V chord. You might make a short shift from I to V and back, just to underscore the ending.

You can start with the reverse statement, from I to V. If a statement end with a V-chord, the music might take a break, but expect something more. This is called a half close. A very simple song structure has two lines. The first starting on I and ending on V. The second line starts with the V-chord, and ends on I. The song Tom Dooley, a song many guitar players learned as their first song, has this structure.

There are thousands of songs that end with a V-I cadence, but usually you will play a few other chords before coming to the cadence.

Go here for more on the V-I and V7-I ending, including a list of songs where you can hear how it works.

Previous page: Previous page: Music Theory for Guitar - 7 means 4: 7th chordsNext page: Music Theory for Guitar - The Plagal Cadence Next page:

Some harmony/chords Theory - books

Top Seller


More >>
Scale Chord Relationships
A Guide to Knowing What Notes to Play - and Why! Scale Chord Relationships teaches players how to determine which scales to play with which chords, so guitarists will never have to fear chord changes again!
RefNr: HL695563
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
MusicRoom
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Other Books


More >>
Quartal Harmony & Voicings for Guitar
This book contains a study and breakdown of "harmony in 4ths". The introduction of quartal harmony in modern jazz began in the 1960's. Compositions by Miles Davis and John Coltrane such as "Impressions" and "So What" showcased chord voicings derived from quartal harmony.
RefNr: MB99971BCD
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Scales and Arpeggios for Guitar, Grades 1-5
Sets out scales by grade in two separate volumes-full fingering fret and string indications given in volume I while volume II gives fingering for Grade 6 and a table of universal fingerings. Both volumes contain notes on the requirements and recommended minimum speeds. Essential publication for examination candidates and their teachers.
RefNr: ABRSM9349
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus

More >>
Treatise on Harmony
One of most important books in Western music. Detailed explanation of principles of diatonic harmonic theory. New 1971 translation by Philip Gossett of 1722 edition. Many musical examples.
RefNr: 0486224619
Order From:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Quartal Harmony: Modern Jazz Comping & Voicings
Modern Jazz Comping & Voicings
RefNr: MB20366DP
Order From:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Go here for full list of harmony/chords Theory books

harmony/chords Theory - videos


More >>
Introduction To Chord Theory And Chord Voicing For The Guitarist
In this 2-DVD set master guitarist and instructor John Miller walks you through the fundamentals of chord theory, providing you with the conceptual tools needed to understand chord structure, and then shows you how to apply that knowledge to the neck of guitar, making practical sense of the information so that you will be equipped to voice chords up and down the neck in any key.
RefNr: GW9945
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
MusicRoom
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Ultimate Guitar Techniques - Chords And The Scales That Fit Them
Join Stuart Bull for a clear and methodical series of lessons in Chords And The Scales That Fit Them.
RefNr: RDR0131
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
MusicRoom

Go here for full list of harmony/chords Theory videos

Previous page: Next page:
Previous page: Music Theory for Guitar - 7 means 4: 7th chords Next page: Music Theory for Guitar - The Plagal Cadence