Bing Hodneland logo

Bestsellers

Books

List Bestselling Books

DVDs

List Bestselling DVDs

Google

Sheet Music Plus Featured Sale
In Association with Amazon.co.uk

All the information on this site is free. But if it is of value to you, I appreciate a tip.


Previous page:

Blues Guitar - Damping techniques

Next page:
Previous page: Blues Guitar - An introduction to turnarounds - the turnaround chord Next page: Blues Guitar - Shuffle

We do not always want the strings to ring out. It creates a stronger rhythm if we cut the notes short and have a more staccato playing. You can damp the strings by either the right hand , the left hand or both.

Rhythm is a key to good blues playing, and you need to learn damping techniques to get the rhythm. It is simple, but you will need a lot of practise to get control.

  12 bar blues Type 1 in E - 6 verses with various damping techniques

Right hand damping

You can damp the strings with your right hand in two different ways. Blues, rock and jazz players will usually damp the strings by either the heel or the side of the hand. You "simply" touch the strings with your hand, and by that stop the ringing. It is "simple", but that does not mean easy. It takes some time to get the control you need. But it is a must for rhythmic playing.

You can vary the time from playing to damping. If you damp hard (short time), it can be almost only rhythm. Is is almost as if you are playing some kind of a drum. A lighter damping will give you more of the actual note. What to prefer depends on what you are playing.

After some time of practise, you will be able to damp the bass-strings and let the treble strings ring out. This can give you a driving rhythm and a singing melody and/or clear harmony at the same time. This is the main element in the Merle Travis / Chet Atkins style.

A classical player will damp by resting the fingertips on the strings. With this technique you can damp out individual strings, which makes it possible to combine legato and staccato lines. But it is harder to get a really driving rhythm with this technique.

Left hand damping

Damping by left hand is also done by touching the strings with your fingers. If you want to damp out individual strings, for instance if one string will give you a note that does not belong to the chord you are playing, you will touch this string with one of your fingers. You will often do it by leaning over the finger that is fretting the adjacent string.

If you are playing barré chords, you can release the barré, and by that damp the whole chord. You can strum the strings without letting them ring, which gives you a strong rhythm. You can have an even strum of 8th or 16th notes, and create a strong syncopated rhythm just by damping with you left hand. This is the key to the rhythm of Bo Diddley.

For more on Rhythm Guitar, go to the Rhythm Guitar Page.

Some General Blues - books

Top Seller


More >>
Blues Guitar Tab White Pages
This outstanding collection features note-for-note transcriptions with tab for 150 blues classics! Songs include: Baby, Please Don't Go * Born Under a Bad Sign * Bridge of Sighs * Cold Shot * Couldn't Stand the Weather * Cross Road Blues (Crossroads) * Double Trouble * Everyday I Have the Blues * I Can't Quit You Baby * I'm Tore Down * Killing Floor * Love in Vain Blues * Motherless Child * Pride and Joy * The Sky Is Crying * Statesboro Blues * Sweet Home Chicago * Texas Flood * The Thrill Is Gone * Tube Snake Boogie * and dozens more!
RefNr: HL700131
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Other Books


More >>
Guitar Journals Blues (Mel Bay's Guitar Journals)
RefNr: MB20896BCD
Order From:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Alfred's PLAY Blues Guitar 1
What do YOU want to PLAY today? The PLAY series has nailed down what today's musician really wants: lessons you can use anytime, anywhere. Theyre flat-out more convenient than private lessons, and just as valuable. The high-quality video of expert instructors will help players of all skill levels, from beginners and "weekend warriors" to advanced students and pros. Whether you're into rock, jazz, blues, folk, country, or a little bit of everything, the PLAY series has all the resources you need at the click of a button.
RefNr: AP34183
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Blues Guitar Licks Chart
RefNr: MB20754
Order From:
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Blues Guitar Ear Training Course
This double CD course is designed for any level, from beginner to advanced.
RefNr: MB99897CD
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Go here for full list of General Blues books

General Blues - videos


More >>
Boogie Woogie Guitar
Del Rey was inspired in equal parts by classic blues guitarists and New Orleans barrelhouse pianists. Her powerful and dynamic style combines blues riffs with walking basses and funky grooves, and she teaches these techniques with style and humor. Great for guitarists who want to move into new and exciting blues territory. Includes music and tab. 90 minutes.
RefNr: HT641895
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
Amazon UK
Amazon US

More >>
Ultimate Blues Jam Session Volume 1
The ultimate DVD for the aspiring blues guitar player, with full tutorial lessons and a generous selection of backing tracks to jam to.
RefNr: RDR0075
Order From:
MusicRoom

More >>
House Of Blues: Learn To Play Blues Guitar - Level 1
Instructor John McCarthy provides a solid foundation in blues playing with this set of one-on-one lessons.
RefNr: FR00932
Order From:
SheetmusicPlus
MusicRoom
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Go here for full list of General Blues videos

Previous page: Previous page: Blues Guitar - An introduction to turnarounds - the turnaround chordNext page: Blues Guitar - Shuffle Next page:

Previous page: Next page:
Previous page: Blues Guitar - An introduction to turnarounds - the turnaround chord Next page: Blues Guitar - Shuffle