Category Archives: Cycling sport

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 19: San Candido/Innichen — Piancavallo

In my opinion, it was a well deserved vicotry to Tejay van Garderen yesterday. It was his first grand tour victory. Now I am hoping that Mikel Landa will win either today or tomorrow. After having been beaten almost on the finish line twice, it would be nice if he could win.

When Nairo Quitana could not win time on Tom Dumoulin yesterday, when will he be able to do it? Quitana has the stronges team, but still they were not able to take time on an isolated Dumoulin. Tom Dumoulin does not have the strongest team. Then it is important to be smart, and Tom Dumoulin has been riding smart.

Today’s stage is 191 km. It starts high, goes up, then more down, up again, even more down, before a final 15 km climb, with 9-14% gradient. It is almost flat, with some ups and downs, for 50 km before the final climb. And there are many long descents. I do not think this is a stage where Quitana will win much time.

We start in Veneto, but far from the vineyards that have made Veneto famous. The riders have not been cycling very long, before they enter Friuli — Venezia Giulia. The name of the province may be a bit confusing to some of us, but maybe not as much for the English speaking people. Venezia is in many languages, including Italian and Norwegian, the city called Venice in English. But Venice is in Veneto, not in Friuli — Venezia Giulia. The name of the province is from the time of the Republic Venezia. The part in Friuli got the name Venezia-Giulia after Julius Caesar. The part in Trentino was called Venice-Tridentina. Friuli, as we will call the province for the sake om simplicity, is an interesting wine region. They produce a lot of red wine, but is first and foremost a white wine region.
Continue reading Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 19: San Candido/Innichen — Piancavallo

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 18: Moena (Val di Fassa) — Oristei/St. Ulrich (Val Gardena)

For me, a triumph for Pierre Roland was fine. It also looked like Tome Demoulin had recovered from his stomach problems. There were noe changes in the GC-classification.

Today it is a relatively short stage, 137 km. There are four climbs, before the top-finish. In a short stage like this, it will probably be action and hard riding. In stages like this, some riders will have problems with the time limit. It will also be the test if Tom Dumoulin has recovered, and has been able to eat enough.

Again, there are mountains, and as always in the mountains: Hard to find wine. After the riders have passed the finish in Oristei/St. Ulrich (Val Gardena) for the first time, they make a turn down to Alto Adige, before returning to Oristei/St. Ulrich (Val Gardena). Alto Adige is the wine district of today.

Continue reading Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 18: Moena (Val di Fassa) — Oristei/St. Ulrich (Val Gardena)

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 17: Tirano — Canazei (Val di Fassa)

Shit happens. Should the peloton have waited? It is hard to say. But they waited for Nairo Quintana when he crashed at stage 15. They will probably do that the next time he is in trouble. I have waited for Vincenzo Nibali to shine. Finally, he gave the Italians something to celebrate.

Today it is another long stage, 219 km, again for the climbers. But it is not as hard as yesterday’s stage. The last 90 km is mainly uphill, and it should invite more atacks.

We start in Tirano. This is the eastern end of Valtellina, which we mentioned yesterday. We do not repeat that. After a short trip to the south, the stage turns east and goes into the mountains. We hare heading out of Lombardy, and enter Trentino — Alto Adige.

Continue reading Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 17: Tirano — Canazei (Val di Fassa)

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017 – Stage 16: Rovetta — Bormio

This is the start of the final week of the Giro. Now it is mountains, mountains and mountains, until the final time trial. If Nairo Quintana still have any hope of winning the giro, he must attack now. Today it is a long stage, 222 km, with three very hard climbs. The riders are crossing the iconic Stelvia pass two times. Or, to be precise, it is not correct. They will cross the Stelvia pass, make a turn, ride into Switzerland, and ride up from the Swiss side, known as the Umbrail-pass, where they come into the road to Stelvio a little below the highest point. From here they ride down the road they have been riding up to Stelvio, down to Bormio. I am glad that I will be watching this on TV, and not will ride the stage. (I would probably not have mastered the first climb, to Montirolo.)

When the riders go into the mountains, it becomes difficult to find wine. We are to high for wine production, with a few exceptions. Some places they grow grapes on southern facing slopes, where the grapes are exposed to the sun.

Today’s stage passes not too far from such an area. If we hard turned west in Edolo, where the riders head to north-northeast i direction Montirolo, we would have arrived in Valtellina. Valtellina goes from Tirano, ca 15 km southwest of where the riders come down from Mortirolo, to lake Como to the west. Lake Como stabilise the climate in the western end. But as we, or rather the riders, are passing a bit away, we will not go into the details this time.

The wines from Valtellina are Rosso di Val­tel­lina DOC, Val­tel­lina Superiore DOCG and Sforzato di Val­tel­lina DOCG. The two first are red wines made mainly from Nebbiolo, which must be at least 90% of the wine. to make it difficult for us outsiders, they use the local name Chia­ven­nasca. Nebbiolo is one of the main grapes in Piedmont.

The sides of Valtellina (the Tellina valley) are steep and terraced, and make the production very difficult.

Dal­si­dene hvor vinen dyr­kes i Val­tel­lina er bratte og ter­ras­serte, så dyr­kin­gen er kre­vende. Paolo Bom­bar­di­eri from Nino Negri says that the best way to transport the harvest from the vinyards with helicopter. Then they can do the job in 80 minutes. The alternative is to have 10 persons work for 550 hours.

The wines from Valtellina are a bit similar to the nebbiolo wines from northern Piedmont. They are not as powerful as Barolo, but have a fine aroma, acid and tanninic structure as is typical for Nebbiolo. Arpepe is an interesting produc er.

Sforzato is a wine made in the same way as Amarone, and is what the Italians call passioto wine. It is made partly from dries grapes. But it is a dry wine, as Amarone, not sweet as the majority of the passioto wines. The grapes must but dried for at least 110 days. The classic Sforzato di Valtellina wine is full-bodied, high in alcohol and rich in flavor. It offers complex aromas of sweet spices (licorice, cloves and cinnamon), stewed plums, prunes, raisins, and the tell-tale hint of tar and roses.

Italian Wines 2016

Italian Wines is published yearly by Gambero Rosso. This is a detailed guide to Italian Wines. 22 000 wines from 2 400 producers are listed in the book. If you want to fine the best wines from the various regions of Italy, this is your guide. This is a type of book I usually use when I am visiting producers, to find the producers to visit.

The book is available in a paper edition and a Kindle edition. One year, I bought the Kindle edition. But for this kind of book, I prefer the paper version. It is available from Amazon UK on paper and for Kindle. And from Amazon US in paperback and as Kindle edition.

Mountain High: Europe's 50 Greatest Cycle Climbs

0857386247If you, like me, want to know more about where they are cycling, particularly about the climbs, Mountain High: Europe's 50 Greatest Cycle Climbs by Daniel Friebe and Pete Goding is the book to have. The book covers 50 of Europe's greatest climbs, among them several of the Tour de France and Giro d'Italia classics. We get description, history, technical details and stunning pictures.

Buy from Amazon UK or Amazon US.

Mountain Higher: Europe's Extreme, Undiscovered and Unforgettable Cycle Climbs

1780879121If you like "Mountain High", and want more, there is a follow up by the same authors. The format is the same. But it covers less known mountain climbs.

Buy from Amazon UK or Amazon US.

 

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d'Italia 2017

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Giro d'Italia

 

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Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017 – Stage 15: Valdengo — Bergamo

An impressive ride from Tom Dumoulin yesterday. It will not be easy for Nairo Quintana to get the time gap he will need before the final time trial.

Today, it may be silence before the storm. The first 150 km are flat. Then the riders hit the mountains. There are one 2nd and one 3rd category climb. But from the last summit, there are 30 km to the finish, mainly descent. Tom Dumoulin is a better descender than Nairo Quintana, so it is unlikely that Quintana will win some time here. Maybe it is a stage where i finally can be an Italian victory, by Vincenzo Nibali.

We start in Piedmont, and go into Lombardy. We start in the wine district where we ended yesterday, and we will not repeat what we said yesterday.

Continue reading Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017 – Stage 15: Valdengo — Bergamo

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017 – Stage 14: Castellania — Oropa (Biella)

It was as expected yesterday, and another victory to Fernando Gaviria. It looks like he is starting to learn how to ride grand tours, even though he has the toughest stages ahead.

Today it is a relatively short stage, 131 km. It starts with a descent. The it is flat to arount 100 km, where it starts to go up. The final is an 11 km first category climb, with 13% as the steepest gradien.

Some teams, who do not have the strongest climbers, will wish to get a lead before the final climb. I do not think they will get it. If the GC teams will let a break away go, they will probably not give them more they they can cathc up with before the the final ascent starts. Nairo Quintana will not only have to catch up with Tom Dumoulin’s lead, he will also need a lead before the final time trial. Some has said that he will need ca two minutes, to win the Giro.

I will expect that Moviestar will set high speed, to make sure that other teams will not get an advantage, and to soften the competitors before the final climb. The team will attack when the ascent starts, and Nairo Quintana and the domestics he may have left, will attack when the climb really starts.

We start a little south of yesterday’s final. But we are in the same wine district, and we will not repeat what we covered yesterday. The stage goes north, through the eastern part of Piedmont. We are passing east of the more well known wine districts in Piedmont. We have to come back to these districts another year.

We come to, or at least close to some of the northern districts in Piedmont. There are nine small wine district. The two more well know are Gattinara and Ghemme. They mainly produce wines from Nebbiolo, locally called Spanna. But they also use other grapes, such as Vespolina and Uva rara. In the middle of the 19th century, the wines from these district had almost as good reputation as the Barolo. But then they went into a long crisis. After they got DOCG-status in 1990, the quality has improved.

The wines are not up to as high standard as good Barolo and Barbaresco. But when buying wines from these lesser known districts, you will not pay as much for the label as we often have to do when buying the more famous cousins.

Of the other seven classified districts, these five are the more interesting:
Boca DOC, Bramaterra DOC, Fara DOC, Lessona DOC and Sizzano DOC. The two oter districts, Colline Novaresi DOC and Coste della Seisa DOC overlap with the seven other, and cover an even wider area. These are not as interesting as the other seven.

Italian Wines 2016

Italian Wines is published yearly by Gambero Rosso. This is a detailed guide to Italian Wines. 22 000 wines from 2 400 producers are listed in the book. If you want to fine the best wines from the various regions of Italy, this is your guide. This is a type of book I usually use when I am visiting producers, to find the producers to visit.

The book is available in a paper edition and a Kindle edition. One year, I bought the Kindle edition. But for this kind of book, I prefer the paper version. It is available from Amazon UK on paper and for Kindle. And from Amazon US in paperback and as Kindle edition.

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d'Italia 2017

Norwegian version

Giro d'Italia

 

Tour de France

 

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017 – Stage 13: Reggio Emilia — Tortona

Today it is flat, almost as flat as a stage can be. In one of the preview videos from one of the cycling magazines, they said that this stage will be a challenge for the commentators. They will have to find something to say, during a stage where very little will happen.

The stage is short, “olny” 167 km (which is about the longest distance I have been cycling in one day). The speed may be high, is someone is willing to set speed. I do not know the Po plain very well. But it is protected by the Alps to the north and the Apeninnes in the south. I do not think wind will be very much of a challenge. But with a bunch of tired riders, some may loose constentration and something may happen. It will probably end with a bunch sprint, and the sprint teams will have to control the stage.

We start in Emilia, and end in Piedmont.Emilia is still not a very interesting wine region. But we can bring along some Parmeggiano-Reggiano cheese, if we should like to have som pasta, risotto or salad. And we can get som ham when we come to Parma.

We can make a detour about 10 km to the south when we come to Piacenza. Here we can find the producer “La Stoppa”, run by Elena Pantaleoni. They produce a wine I think of as an oddity: An orange wine: “Ageno”.

There are basically two processes to produce wine. The colour is in the grape’s skin, tannins are in the seeds. When producing red wine, the must is fermented with skin and seeds. When producing white wine, the sin and seeds are sifted from the must. A white wine can be produced from red grapes, as the champagne blanc de noirs. When making a rosé, the skin and seeds are left in the must for some time, before they are sifted out.

An orange wine is produced from white grapes in a red wine process, with skin and seeds in the entire fermentation process. This gives an ofte tanninic white that is almost orange in colour.

The may issue of Decanter has a tasting of “nature wines”, a not very clear concept. It is a blind test of 122 wines of all types and from many countries. They selected on winner, and a list of top ten from each of the panelists. And the winner is: La Stoppa Ageno 2011.

To be honest, the La Stoppa Ageno is not my favourite. I have not tasted the 2011 vintage, my reference is 2006. I will not generalise to all orange wines, as I have tasted orange wines that are more to my taste. But it is an interesting wine a wine lover should taste, and make up his or her own mind.

Today’s stage ends in Piedmont, the leading wine region in Italy, with great wines like Barolo, Barbarsco, many Barbera and Dolcetto-wines, and many other wines. But we end in an outskirt of Piedmont, Colli Tortonesi DOC. They produce reds from Barbera. But the wine that has gotten the most attention is a white made from the local grape Timorasso.

Dagens etappe ender i Piemonte, Italias ledende vinregion, med storheter som Barolo, Barbarsco, mange Barbera og Dolcetto-viner, osv. Men vi ender i en utkant av Piemonte, et stykke fra regionens vinflaggskip. Vi er i det ikke veldig kjente vinområdet Colli Tortonesi DOC. Her produseres det en del rødvin av Barbera. Men den vinen som særlig har fått oppmerksomhet, er en hvitvin laget av den lokale druen Timorasso.

A Timarosso from Colli Tortonesi DOC should be the wine of today.

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017 – Stage 12: Forlì — Reggio Emilio

It was more action than I had expected yesterday, and I hope to see action on the remaining stages.

Today I think there will be a bunch sprint. The stages goes in flat terrain, but take a turn into Tuscany. There are two categorised climbs, but they should not be too difficult. After these two climbs, the rest is flat to the finish. It should not be too difficult to control a break away. But the sprint teams will have to do the job.

We are in Emilia-Romagna. This is in fact two areas: Emilia is the area to the west and north-east. Romagna is the southern corner.

Before we start looking for wines, we have to lay the table. About 10 km from the start, the riders come to the town Faenza. This town is known for pottery and tableware faience. The word faience derives from the name of this town. It was French traders that called it faience. The production started in the 16th century. The workshop Casa Pirotta was regarded as the best producer.

We are on the Po-plain, probably Italy’s richest agricultural area. Rich soil can give high quantity, but usually not high quality. We get the best wines from poor soil, with challenging climatic conditions. Grapes that have to fight to survive, produce the best wine.

We can start with a wine we can keep for the dessert. When the stage turns to the left in Faenza, the riders come into the wine district Albana di Romagna. Here they make wine from the grape Albana. We get the wine in various degrees of sweetness, from dry to a sweet passioto, dessert wine. It is the sweeter wine that is more interesting.

We continue into the wine district Colli di Faenza before we go into the mountains. It is a rather new classification, and has yet to produce very interesting wines.

When we return from the mountains, we are in Emilia. The first wine district is Colli Bolognesi. Within this classification, they produce a large number of wines from many different grapes. They make some very good wines from international, or rather French grapes, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Chardonnay. But the more interesting wines are made from the white grape Pignoletto.

The region can offer a lot more like wine. To be honest, other products may be more interesting than the wine. We can start with the dish we find on almost every childs menu: Pasta bolognese. Pasta with meat sauce. It can of course be an intersting dish, if made properly.

We are then going through Modena. Modena is known for its Balsamico Vinegar. Balsamico is made from a reduction of cooked white Trebbiano grape juice. For the real (and very expensive) thing, we must go for traditional Balsamico, Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale. There is an inexpensive imitation Aceto Balsamico di Modena. It is made, or rather mautured in a process rather simialar to how Oloroso Sherry is made, called Solera in Sherry production. It must be aged for at least 12 years. At the end of the aging period, a small portion is drawn from the smallest cask. Then it is topped up with the contents of the preceding (next larger) cask, and so the process goes on. Freshly cooked grape must is then added to the largest cask. Every subsequent years, this process is repeated.

We are in the area for one of the region’s more well known wines: Lambrusco. Lambrusco is a red, sparkling wine. Its popularity is growing. I have to admit that Lambrusco has never been among my favourites. But I have to give it another try. It could be a god wine to go with a dish like pasta bolognese. For more on Lambrusco, I will refer to the Decanter article from February 2016, Five of the best Lambrusco wines to try.

We finish in the town Reggio Emilio. Here we can find something we need for the pasta dish: Parmeggiano Reggiano, often, and uncorreclty referred to as “parmesan”. Parmesan is a designation that is illegal to use in Europe. Parmeggiano Reggiano is the version of this hard cheese from small producers.

There are ca 600 producers of the cheese, getting milk from 10.000 farmers in the region. The well known, high quality cheees are made with good raw materials, by highly skilled small scale producers, witin strict regulations.

Grana Padano is a rather similar cheese, often produced in larger scale, further to the west.

Italian Wines 2016

Italian Wines is published yearly by Gambero Rosso. This is a detailed guide to Italian Wines. 22 000 wines from 2 400 producers are listed in the book. If you want to fine the best wines from the various regions of Italy, this is your guide. This is a type of book I usually use when I am visiting producers, to find the producers to visit.

The book is available in a paper edition and a Kindle edition. One year, I bought the Kindle edition. But for this kind of book, I prefer the paper version. It is available from Amazon UK on paper and for Kindle. And from Amazon US in paperback and as Kindle edition.

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d'Italia 2017

Norwegian version

Giro d'Italia

 

Tour de France

 

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 11: Firenze (Ponte A Ema) — Bagno de Romagna

Today, May 17th, is the National day (Constitution day) here in Norway. This is why I have included the Norwegian flag.

We are now in the middle of the Giro. This is stage 11 of 21. We (or the riders) have done 10 stages before today, and it remains 10 stages when today’s stage is completed.

Yesterday was as I hoped, and expected. Tom Dumoulin gained so much time on Nairo Quintana that Quintana has to attack. In the week.end, and even more next week, the giro goes into the mountains. Here Nairo Quintana must attack, not only to catch up with Tom Dumoulin. The final stage of the Giro is another ca 30 km time trail. Nairo Quintana will need a time buffer before this time trial, to win the Giro. This should give us a lot of action. I also liked that Geraint Thomas did a good time trial, and climbed to a good position in the GC. But he is too far behind to win the Giro.

Today, there are four classified climbs. But from the last summit, there are 25 km more or less downhill to the finish. I do not think that the GC-contenders will attack, after having used a lot of energy in yesterday’s time trial. If they attack on the last climb, it will be difficult to maintain a lead to the finish. The sprint teams will not be strong enough to control the peloton. I think it will be a break away with riders who took it easy yesterday, and are no threats to the GC-contenders, can make it to the finish.

When I saw the details of today’s stage, I was disappointed. We start in Florence, the heart of Tuscany. The stage follows the only route out of Florence that does not go through any wine district.

If we choose almost any other way than today’s stage out of Florence, we will come into Tuscany’s most famous wine region: Chianti.

tuscany-wine-map

Chianti is Tuscany’s heart and soul. It is made from Sangiovese, sometimes with some other grapes.

Chianti was “invented” by baron Bettino Riascoli i the middle of the 19th century. He made a recipe which said it should be Sangiovese, with some Canaiolo added to soften the wine. The recipe has been changed many times since that.

Chianti_ClassicoThe producers in the orginal area did not like that many others sold their wines as Chianti. In 1924 they formed a producers association, the first in Italy: Gallo Nero — The black rooster. 95% of the Chianti Classico producers are now members of Gallo Nero. Gallo Nero is the logo of Chianti Classico. I do not know why it says 1716 on the label.

Chianti was, as som many wines, in decline until the 1970s. The productoin was high, and the quality low. They blended in to much white/green grapes, sometimes as much as 30%, and they blended in low quality wind from Soutern Italy.

Chianti_bastflaskeChianti was for a long time mainly known for the straw covered bottle fiasco (“flask”; pl. fiaschi), more than for the wine in the bottle. It may have been good for marketing. People did not know much about Italian wine, and maybe there was not too much of interest to know some decades ago. But the knew the Chianti bottle, and Chianti was the Italian wine. But things have changed. Serious producers wanted that their wine should be known for the content in the bottles, not just for the bottles. They wanted to escape from the cheap tourist wine image.

I visited Italy for the first time when I was traveling on Inter Rail in the mid 1970s. It was very exiting for me, who had hardly been outside of Norway at the time. I remember the Chianti bottles, not the wine. When the train stopped at the stations, sellers where walking along the train with their trolleys, shouting “Birra! Chianti vino!” But with my travel budget at the time, it was important that the wine was cheap. I could not afford to think about quality.

Through the years, the area for classified Chianti has been expanded, and some will say watered out. In Italy “Classico” designates the original production area, which is often the best area. Chianti got DOCG classification in 1984, and Chianti Classico their own DOCG in 1996.

Gambero Rosso Italian Wines use glasses as symbol of classication. Three glasses, (Tre Bicchieri) is awarded to an excellent wine in its category. When a producer has been awarded ten Tre Bicchieris, it is awarde a star. Another ten Tre Bicchieris, and they get a new star. The Piemont producer Gaja is on top of the list of Italian producers, with five starts for 54 Tre Bicchieris. A star designates a producer with consistent, high quality over time.

This year, 19 Chinati Classico-producers have been awarded Tre Bicchieri. The Chianti Classico producers who have been awardes stars, are:

  • Marchesi Antinori **
  • Barone Ricasoli **
  • Brancaia *
  • Castellare di Castellina *
  • Castello di Ama **
  • Castello di Fonterutoli ***
  • Fattoria di Felsina **
  • Tenute Ambrogio e Giovanni Folonari *
  • Fontodi **
  • Isole e Olena **
  • Ruffino (not to be confused with the area Rufina) *
  • San Felice *

A top producer does not produce only top wines. The majority of the large producers have wines in many categories and price levels.

Italian Wines 2016

Italian Wines is published yearly by Gambero Rosso. This is a detailed guide to Italian Wines. 22 000 wines from 2 400 producers are listed in the book. If you want to fine the best wines from the various regions of Italy, this is your guide. This is a type of book I usually use when I am visiting producers, to find the producers to visit.

The book is available in a paper edition and a Kindle edition. One year, I bought the Kindle edition. But for this kind of book, I prefer the paper version. It is available from Amazon UK on paper and for Kindle. And from Amazon US in paperback and as Kindle edition.

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d'Italia 2017

Norwegian version

Giro d'Italia

 

Tour de France

 

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d’Italia 2017. Stage 10: Foligno — Montefalco

I wanted action on Sunday. But I did not want trouble because a police officer had parked his motorcycle on the wrong side of the road. But the attack from Nairo Quintana, this was what we had been waiting for. Today, the question is if Nairo Quintana’s advantage is enough to stay ahead of riders like Tom Dumoulin, Thibaut Pinot and Vincenzo Nibali  after the time trial.

The riders do not get a soft start after the rest day, at least not the riders with GC ambitions or rides who want to win the stage. The cannot take it easy in the beginning, to get the body going again. For domestics with no indiviual ambitions and not very much to fight for, it may be what Jens Voigt once called a “semi rest day”. They have to finish within he time limit, without using too much power.

Usually it is hard to find wine along a rather short time trial. But today the major part of the stage is within the Montefalco district. We enter Montefalco when we get the first intermediary time.

Montefalco is the district for one of Italy’s top wines. Montefalco DOC include reds made mainly from Sangiovese, and whites made from Grechetto.

But the really interesting wine is Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG. This is the jewel of the district, and one of Italy’s rather unknown gems. Sagrantino is Umbria’s own grape, even though its origin is unknown. It is a small, thick skinned grape with much of everything: Colour, acid, tannins and sugar. It gives dark and powerful wine with great depht and flavour, tanninic, high in acidity and alcohol.

The original Montefalco Sagrantino was a passioto, a sweet dessert wine made from dried grapes. It is regarded as one of Italy’s better dessert wines. A dry Montefalco Sagrantino did not hit the market before 1972.

A Sagrantino must be stored for at least 30 months. For a dry Sagrantino, at least 12 of these months must be in oak barrels. Montefalco Sagrantino is said to be a good alternative to Barolo. Give it a try. It should be the wine of today.

Italian Wines 2016

Italian Wines is published yearly by Gambero Rosso. This is a detailed guide to Italian Wines. 22 000 wines from 2 400 producers are listed in the book. If you want to fine the best wines from the various regions of Italy, this is your guide. This is a type of book I usually use when I am visiting producers, to find the producers to visit.

The book is available in a paper edition and a Kindle edition. One year, I bought the Kindle edition. But for this kind of book, I prefer the paper version. It is available from Amazon UK on paper and for Kindle. And from Amazon US in paperback and as Kindle edition.

Wines (and some other drinks) of Giro d'Italia 2017

Norwegian version

Giro d'Italia

 

Tour de France